MELINDA

Mobility Ecosystem for Low-carbon and INnovative moDal shift in the Alps

MELINDA’s MOBILITY PILOT STORIES

Below, feedback from our pilot story from Ebersberg,  Germany

CAR-POOLING IN THE DISTRICT OF EBERSBERG: NETWORK OF HITCHHIKING BENCHES

The pilot project aims at improving intermodal mobility options with a focus on the more rural areas of the region. Hitchhiking as a form of transportation and alternative to public transport is not yet established in the population and a good connection of the hitchhiking benches to other mobility services (information system of the public transport provider; car sharing) is not available yet.

 

 


We present 3 interviews with involved citizens

Citizen 1, Sepp B., Grafing:

1. Why did you decide to participate in the pilot project? (Motives, values, needs, …)
For me as a user of carpools in work and leisure traffic, saving energy has a high priority - in the area of mobility, CO2 savings are currently added to this. I have been active in this field for many years, giving lectures and operating my own meta-carpooling platform. When the MELINDA project made my home district of Ebersberg a pilot region for ride-sharing, I definitely wanted to get involved. Unfortunately, many people prefer to drive a car by themselves instead of giving someone a ride. Ridesharing should be better integrated into everyday life, it should be given a higher status in society, because without a reduction in traffic, a mobility turnaround will not be possible.


2. Did you learn anything new participating in the pilot project? (new data, new people, new network, about yourself)
The network created in this project around the topic of ride-sharing is very interesting for me and definitely represents added value for the region. Even though the ride-sharing benches could only be included in the MELINDA app to a certain extent, I am confident that the regional efforts in this area can make a difference. One insight that has been reinforced for me in the project is that ridesharing networks should not create new traffic (see Uber), but rather make better use of existing traffic. And in this sense, this is not in competition with public transport, but can support it.


3. Did your mobility habits change to more sustainable mobility choices due to participation in the pilot project?
Unfortunately, the Corona pandemic has clearly paralyzed rather than promoted the planned effort. Nevertheless, I am not frustrated and hope that a mobility turnaround will get underway in the period following this incision. In this context, a ride-sharing app would probably be the necessary digital and contemporary solution, but will only be able to catch on if the critical mass is right. If this is implemented, I will definitely support it. My own mobility has changed rather little as a result of the project, but this is also due to the fact that I try to cover most distances by bike anyway. I will continue to do so. 

 

Citizen 2, Bärbel Z., Oberpframmern:

1. Why did you decide to participate in the pilot project? (Motives, values, needs, …)
Advancing climate protection measures is very close to my heart and I see the mobility turnaround as a very important building block in this process. This change in mobility must be analysed and implemented with all its facets; the ride-sharing benches and ride-sharing in general offer an enormous opportunity here to reduce the number of cars and the associated emissions, while in turn increasing people's mobility. Furthermore, as an old-school hitchhiker, I was also personally interested in this project.


2. Did you learn anything new participating in the pilot project? (new data, new people, new network, about yourself)
The differently polarized groups that were already dealing with this issue in the region have found compromises in the network thanks to good and competent management. The common goal of an improved traffic situation has brought the parties together. It would be nice if the Bundesverband Mitfahren could also succeed in doing this on a larger scale, since a uniform nationwide ride-sharing system would be a strong message and could more easily reach critical mass.
 

3. Did your mobility habits change to more sustainable mobility choices due to participation in the pilot project?
Due to the Corona pandemic, mobility has changed to such an extent that all the small changes, however positive, have been lost in it. I myself was therefore extremely little mobile for almost 1.5 years and the ride along has unfortunately faded into the background despite the project. I hope that after the pandemic and the resulting distancing from each other, we will find our way back to togetherness and community-based neighbourly help, as advertised by the ride-sharing benches.



Citizen 3, Hans G., Glonn:

1.Why did you decide to participate in the pilot project? (Motives, values, needs, …)
I believed then, and still do, that ride-sharing will be an important part of the extremely necessary mobility turnaround that is difficult to implement in Germany. Our society must and will develop greater awareness of sharing in general. Sharing rides that are happening anyway, in cars that are on the road anyway, can become a big component in transportation.


2. Did you learn anything new participating in the pilot project? (new data, new people, new network, about yourself)
Even though I was already active in this area, this project made me realize once again that it is not easy to convince people of this topic and motivate them to implement it. Many people have a certain inhibition threshold to get involved here. Unfortunately, the pandemic has made this even worse in some cases. Nevertheless, I am glad that even while riding along I met new people with a mindset that is very similar to mine. It was also motivating to learn that initiatives in the region are already working on this very issue here and that you are not on your own.


3.Did your mobility habits change to more sustainable mobility choices due to participation in the pilot project?
The implementation of a ride-sharing app could lead to an increase in the use of the ride-sharing benches, because there would be less anonymity and insecurity and people could be sure of getting a ride. This, in turn, would lead to people being much more confident about sitting on the benches, as they would not be at the mercy of the fear of being left behind. Since I already cycle as much as possible, especially to promote my health as well, my attitude towards mobility has not really changed.
 


Impressions from new pilot story

“THE WAY TO ATTRACTIVE AND SUSTAINABLE CITY”, MARIBOR, SLOVENIA

Key goals of the Maribor pilot project are to establish an efficient system for collecting data on sustainable mobility, to set-up a transparent interface for reviewing sustainable mobility data for both citizens and decision-makers, to examine the travel habits of citizens and suggest options for a more sustainable way of overcoming distances around the city and to motivate the inhabitants of Maribor to use more environmentally friendly means of traveling around the city (on foot, by bike or by bus).

 



We present 6 interviews with involved stakeholders.

Citizen 1

What was your experience using the portal/viewer? Please, write down what did you like, what did you miss?
I liked the use of the portal, especially the possibility of displaying answers to survey questions in the form of different graphs and the possibility of simultaneous/parallel comparison of two questions.

I also liked the Sustainable Mobility Viewer. In the future, I see a lot of possibilities for the collected open data from the field of sustainable mobility to be used to build an application for sustainable route planning in the city of Maribor.

At the same time, it would be great if the data on the portal could be upgraded with other data related to traffic (including unsustainable forms), as this way we would really have all the information/data important for route planning in the city and its surroundings and for mobility planning gathered in one place (e.g. data on parking places, occupancy of parking places; delivery places; places for short-term parking, etc.).
 

Did you get any new information about the offer of sustainable mobility in Maribor through the use of the portal? Did you discover anything new while testing the tool?
The new information offered to me by the portal was mainly metadata and the possibility of exporting data in various forms.

I liked the display of the driving area of the mini vehicle Maister and the contact details for calling up the vehicle.


Do you think that awareness of the sustainable mobility offer and all the data gathered in one place can influence a change in your travel habits?
I believe that data gathered in one place could influence a change in travel habits. These data will have an even greater impact on changing the travel habits of citizens when route planning applications are developed based on them.
 

What other information would you like to see on the sustainable mobility portal/viewer?
On the portal, I would also like information on the Ropeway Pohorska vzepnjača, information about the boat ride on the Drava River, and information on the route/ride of the tourist train.

Information that is important for planning the route of people with disabilities would also be very welcome (possible critical points/ramps for the disabled; sound traffic lights (important for the blind and visually impaired); information on city buses/lines on which you can take a bike;).

With the possible development of a route planning application, data on the real arrivals of city buses at bus stations would be very welcome (now the displays are installed only at individual bus stations).
 

Do you know any other similar portal or viewer (you can list domestic or foreign good practices) that offers open data on sustainable mobility?
I do not know any portal that focuses on collecting open data on the topic of sustainable mobility.

I know the traffic portal https://prominfo.projekti.si/web/. The portal shows current traffic information for Ljubljana. The portal collects a lot of information about mobility (not only sustainable mobility), which is geolocated and displayed on the map, but it does not allow the transfer of open data, nor does it allow route planning.



Citizen 2

What was your experience using the portal/viewer? Please, write down what did you like, what did you miss?
The portal is clear and visually appealing and contains interesting information on sustainable mobility. All four parts on the portal make sense to me from the point of view that the portal is set up as the City Municipality’s first open data portal that can provide data to those interested in developing their services or applications. I find it especially useful to have this information displayed in space within the viewer, as this gives me a sense of where something is located. I think that both the portal and the viewer have a lot of upgrade options. E.g. in terms of adding new data layers, the introduction of interactive traffic meters connected to parking space sensors (if ever introduced), or the possibility of route planning. Perhaps you could also add a link to the Izboljšajmo Maribor application (Let's Improve Maribor) on the portal.


Did you get any new information about the offer of sustainable mobility in Maribor through the use of the portal? Did you discover anything new while testing the tool?
What I found most interesting was the display of all the data geolocated in space. On the other hand, I have become acquainted with the concept of metadata and that interested parties can now export this data for their own needs.


Do you think that awareness of the sustainable mobility offer and all the data gathered in one place can influence a change in your travel habits?
The offer of sustainable mobility, which is displayed within the portal and the viewer, and all the data collected have only consolidated my travel habits (I go to work by bike or on foot or sometimes by bus).


What other information would you like to see on the sustainable mobility portal/viewer?
Interactive traffic cameras in Maribor, traffic meters, real-time forecasts of bus arrivals at individual stations, display of parking space occupancy.


Do you know any other similar portal or viewer (you can list domestic or foreign good practices) that offers open data on sustainable mobility?
An example of a foreign practice from Ireland, where sustainable mobility is one of the segments: https://data.corkcity.ie/

And from home practice, I know the traffic portal  https://prominfo.projekti.si/web/, which does not allow access and transfer of open data.

 

Citizen 3

What was your experience using the portal/viewer? Please, write down what did you like, what did you miss?
The viewer is great and I hope it will be upgraded in the future. I also like the portal and I suggest that we promote it as part of the European Mobility Week.


Did you get any new information about the offer of sustainable mobility in Maribor through the use of the portal? Did you discover anything new while testing the tool?
I think it's great that you can export the folders.


Do you think that awareness of the sustainable mobility offer and all the data gathered in one place can influence a change in your travel habits?
Yes, if the data is gathered in one place and transparent, it is easier to plan a trip with a sustainable mobile device.


What other information would you like to see on the sustainable mobility portal/viewer?
I would also add educational footpaths, a corner for communication or proposing ideas, mistakes, news, etc. (e.g.: damage to roads, sidewalks, traffic signal damage, incorrectly parked cars, littered areas, abandoned/run down animals), road conditions (barriers), recommendations for sustainable mobility, promotion of public transport, cycling, walking and its positive effects on health and environment, discounts for tickets, traffic safety, bicycle repairs could also be added to the offer. I would also add meters for pedestrians, cyclists, cars.

If the portal itself will be upgraded and will also be used for route planning, I also suggest the links to the portal (QR codes) at bus stations.


Do you know any other similar portal or viewer (you can list domestic or foreign good practices) that offers open data on sustainable mobility?
https://www.ljubljana.si/sl/moja-ljubljana/promet-in-mobilnost/

https://urbanmobilityindex.here.com/city/copenhagen/

https://www.sptm.si/praksa/projekti/2019/07/uirs-atlas-dostopnosti

 

Citizen 4

What was your experience using the portal/viewer? Please, write down what did you like, what did you miss?
The first visit to the website is very positive. The colour combination on the first page is very good. I really like the viewer where the default map does not stand out and the elements/layers are very well visible. The ability to change the colour and thickness of each layer could be added. In my opinion, the "Search" function is unnecessary, given that only the Municipality of Maribor is included.


Did you get any new information about the offer of sustainable mobility in Maribor through the use of the portal? Did you discover anything new while testing the tool?
The website really is the crossroads of all data on population mobility. Yes, I discovered something new, as there was no possibility of a quick overview of the transport infrastructure before.


Do you think that awareness of the sustainable mobility offer and all the data gathered in one place can influence a change in your travel habits?
I don't think so. Changing travel habits takes some time.


What other information would you like to see on the sustainable mobility portal?
GHG emissions, cycle corridors, https://ibikemaribor.com/kolesarsko-omrezje/


Do you know any other similar portal or viewer (you can list domestic or foreign good practices) that offers open data on sustainable mobility?

http://meteo.arso.gov.si/met/sl/climate/change/

https://www.eltis.org/in-brief/facts-figures

https://bikesharemap.com/#/3/-60/25/

https://ourworldindata.org/energy/country/slovenia?country=~SVN

https://stats.oecd.org/Index.aspx?DataSetCode=AIR_GHG

 

 

Citizen 5

What was your experience using the portal/viewer? Please, write down what did you like, what did you miss?
I liked the simplicity, the transparency, the usability. I missed the following: providers - what is their advantage of “sustainable mobility” (what do we gain or replace with them and is therefore better, more sustainable; there are only links…)


Did you get any new information about the offer of sustainable mobility in Maribor through the use of the portal? Did you discover anything new while testing the tool?
I got new information! There were many and there are many more (it will take a longer time to test)


Do you think that awareness of the sustainable mobility offer and all the data gathered in one place can influence a change in your travel habits?
Absolutely; a systematic presentation of the portal to a (wider) crowd of (potential) users would be needed; especially what and why it “pays off”


What other information would you like to see on the sustainable mobility portal?
Real-time data (if possible); to what extent do we already use this system and what are the benefits/advantages/user experience…


Do you know any other similar portal or viewer (you can list domestic or foreign good practices) that offers open data on sustainable mobility?
I don't know if it's the same/similar portal; but I used something similar in Prague, London, USA (San Francisco) ...

 

Citizen 6

What was your experience using the portal/viewer? Please, write down what did you like, what did you miss?
The viewer is well made and guides you nicely around the map. Maybe it would be good to include the photos. But because there is a huge amount of data, an oversized photo database would be needed.


Did you get any new information about the offer of sustainable mobility in Maribor through the use of the portal? Did you discover anything new while testing the tool?
Yes, I found new information on the offer of sustainable mobility. I am very pleased that the places of electric car chargers are listed on the portal.


Do you think that awareness of the sustainable mobility offer and all the data gathered in one place can influence a change in your travel habits?
Yes, I will change my travel habits if I travel inside Maribor. Otherwise, I drive to work from Ptuj.


What other information would you like to see on the sustainable mobility portal?
Real-time data


Do you know any other similar portal or viewer (you can list domestic or foreign good practices) that offers open data on sustainable mobility?
I have already come across similar portals in European cities. Mainly for renting bicycles and showing the location of electric car chargers. However, there were not as many different useful data gathered in one place as in the sustainable mobility portal in Maribor. When I was looking for materials for the Smart Mobility course, I found the Triomet project from the USA - a multimodal trip planner that covers public passenger and cycling traffic.

https://www.transportation.institute.ufl.edu/wp-content/uploads/2020/12/Barbeau-12-04-20-Inter-Trans-Res-Symposium.pdf


We would like to present to you our third PILOT STORY

“CROSS-BORDER SMART MOBILITY WITHIN THE GREATER REGION OF VORARLBERG”

The main objective of the V-Mob pilot is to collect (cross-border) data about citizens mobility, mobility patters, passenger preferences, behaviours and patterns to structurally analyse these. These analyses will be the major source of innovation for governance and decision makers. These analyses will provide data about the use of infrastructure and its further development (e.g. identification of the mobility hubs, construction sites, frequent used streets, shortcuts, etc. Additionally, these analyses enable to compare existing services about mobility, passenger preferences, behaviours and patterns in order to reach set objectives.

We present two interviews with involved stakeholders.

Interview with ms Viktoriia Simakova

1.Why did you decide to participate in the pilot project? (Motives, values, needs, …)

I actually came across the Melinda project by chance. In summer 2019 I was looking for a mandatory internship and became aware of a practicum at the University of Applied Sciences Vorarlberg (FHV) that I found on the FFG talent internship portal. The internship included active project work and research on the subject of "Mobility of the Future", carrying out surveys (interviews) on the subject of “Travel Behavior”, evaluating and analyzing the collected data and writing a report about it. Besides that, activities like testing the MELINDA app and translating the app into different languages as well as writing a user documentation for the MELINDA app in English were also a significant part of the internship. All these interesting tasks and the desire for work experience at a University of Applied Sciences convinced me to do an internship at the FHV.

2. Did you learn anything new participating in the pilot project? (new data, new people, new network, about yourself)

I was satisfied in every way with my internship at the FHV. All activities I found very exciting. I really enjoyed the contact with many people of different ages and with different opinions which I had while interviewing. As part of the event called “Mobility Day Dornbirn 2019“ I were even able to meet the Austrian President Alexander van der Bellen and to involve him in our research by giving him a questionnaire which also included a stamped return envelope to answer independently.

Furthermore, I heard a lot of ideas of the citizens aimed to improve the traffic situation and protect the environment. These encounters left a generally positive impression and made me think about the current situation of mobility in Vorarlberg as well as about Mobility of the Future and innovation related to it a lot.

After the internship I wrote an internship report and submitted it to the FFG – the Austrian promotion agency. My report was recognized by the FFG as one of the 20 best reports of 2019, which is why I was invited to an award ceremony in Vienna in February 2020 and were able to meet the other students dedicated to research work. Moreover, a year after the internship I started my studies on computer science and decided to continue my work at the FHV and with that at the Melinda project, as I already had experience and insights in it.

During the current year I gained even more understanding in project work and sustainable mobility. I had the opportunity take part at the events called “Vorarlberg MOBILWoche2020”, “Lange Nacht der Forschung 2020” (LNF20), “WalkSpace Conference 2020”, “Vorarlberger Technik Tag” and at the SaMBA Competition called “Your Vision of the Future Alpine Mobility” and there to meet even more like-minded people and to build awareness of the citizens on the Melinda IT component and the eco-friendly mobility of the future.

3. Did your mobility habits changed to more sustainable mobility choices due to participation in the pilot project?

The content-related discussion on the subject of “Mobility of the Future” during my work on the Melinda project provided me with information that helps me to make better and more sustainable decisions regarding transport in everyday life.

Furthermore, the fact that the pandemic occurred while I was participating in the pilot project sustainable mobility became even more significant in my life. Now I am thinking much harder about journeys I would have taken without a moment’s consideration. I am more conscious of my mobility consumption and I am taking fewer and shorter journeys, as I spend more time closer to home. I even became more engaged in my local communities.

I hope to notice positive effects on air quality and greenhouse gas emissions, and I believe that a long-term improvement towards sustainable mobility for everyone and a future with greener transportation options should continue to be achieved.

 

Interview with Firdes Kiraci

1. Why did you decide to participate in the pilot project? (Motives, values, needs, …)

The Melinda project internship gave me an excellent insight into research and science. With my skills, I was able to engage well and of course learn a lot. For example, I learned that a systematic approach to science must be strictly observed. I enjoyed going to the weekly markets and doing empirical research. Finding people who agreed to be interviewed was challenging, yet we came up with a good end result. Listening to the views of young and old was very interesting. We also received many suggestions for improvement in favor of the environment.

In the course of the internship, I was able to experiment with the statistics programming language R during the evaluation. The courses on literature research, statistics on the PC, R, epistemology and video editing were very exciting and fun. I was able to expand my Excel and statistics knowledge with the Chi2test function. As well as for my future diploma thesis I could get acquainted with the program Zotero. The experience I gained and the new knowledge I gained will help me a lot in my future school career. I am very satisfied with the internship within the Melina project and at the University of Applied Sciences Vorarlberg.



We continue with our PILOT PROJECT STORIES.

Our next story is about Taxito ridesharing in rural Switzerland.

Pilot project »Taxito ridesharing in rural Switzerland « is offering local population groups in several rural villages such as Maladers (Chur), Seetal (Lucerne/Aargau), Luthern, Willisau, etc. (Lucerne) ridesharing services. These villages have poor public services. The goal of this pilot project is to solve the first/last mile problem. That means it provides a mobility service for local populations who have no access to private cars or no driving license or have a physical problem for driving a car. 

Taxito ridesharing functions as follows: the passenger walks to the closest Taxito notice board and sends the Taxito platform a SMS with the destination s/he wants to travel to. The Taxito notice board then shows this destination. Drivers see it and spontaneously decide to pick up the passenger. The passenger sends the Taxito platform the plate number. This is to increase passenger’s security. No registration is required. The passenger has to pay a flat ticket (e.g. CHF 3 per ride) charged directly from their mobile phone credit. Drivers are volunteer. The key concept of the Taxito ridesharing programme is community-oriented ridesharing. It aims not to replace (or compete with) public transport transit but rather to complement this mode of transport.

Excerpts from interviews document experiences of local people who used Taxito ridesharing as passengers and drivers. The interviews cover a broader topic than the questions posted below. The interviews were conducted by Jason Traxel and Nicole Lehmann who are pursuing a Bachelor Program in International Business Administration at Lucerne University of Applied Sciences and Arts.


Interview with a driver – a 69 year old man, November 2020

1. Why did you engage in Taxito ridesharing service as a driver?
I was involved in Taxito ridesharing from the beginning… I registered myself as a driver for Taxito at an information event organized in our village because I think Taxito is good for our community…and because we do not have frequent public transport services. In addition, because I was myself travelling a lot; and I thought, I could contribute to this ridesharing service in which I give people a ride… That was my hope. 

2. And what were your experiences as a driver for Taxito Ridesharing?
I have in fact no experiences with Taxito because I haven’t seen somebody who has waited for Taxito. But I once gave a ride to someone who has waited for a bus and asked me when the bus departures… I have told this person that she can use the Taxito ridesharing service…

3. Would you use Taxito if you do not or no longer have your car?
Yes, because otherwise I have no other choices … no relative who could offer me a ride to travel outside of our village to visit a doctor or do shopping.


Interview with a driver – a 43 year old man, November 2020

1. Why did you engage in Taxito ridesharing services as a driver?
I first heard about Taxito at our municipality meeting and from a brochure that I received together with an invitation to the meeting. My opinion is that it [Taxito] is a good thing. Because we have a bad Postauto [bus] service that runs only six or seven times a day; with Taxito you do not have to wait two hours for the Postauto …or in the evening, after 7 pm, when the Postauto does not run anymore, you can still have a chance to go to the train station or go out of the valley. 

2. And what were your experiences as a driver for Taxito Ridesharing?
I have already two times gave a ride to Taxito passengers. The first time was very interesting. He [an acquaintance] wanted to test the system [Taxito Ridesharing Service]… He has pressed [a button] and as I had to go to Ettiswill and saw him…so I stopped and gave him a ride. … I have already recognized him as he got into my car. He told me that he knew about Taxito during his study and he has wondered how long he must wait until somebody who drives to the same destination picks him up. He had to wait only 30 seconds until I stopped my car and picked him up.

The second time was a wanderer who wanted to go to the train station. I did not know this person. He had to wait for about four to five minutes.

I think Taxito is good because one can track back to the mobile phone number, in case something happens. With hitchhikes, one has no chance [to do so]. Therefore, I think Taxito is safer…I will continue to engage in Taxito as a driver. Because it is good for my village.

3. Did you learn anything new when engaging in Taxito as a driver, like social aspects?
Certainly, it isn’t bad, especially for somebody like me who likes to talk and seeks for conversations. Then comes new things and maybe one can learn something new. I think you get much more into the conversation with Taxito than when you drive with public transport through the village.

4. Have you used Taxito as a passenger?
No, I have to take my car. I have to travel back and forth between my house and my workplace. I do not think about this at all. I just seat in my car and drive.

5. If you didn’t have a car, would you use Taxito as a passenger?
Yes, I would use it for a doctor’s visit in a neighboring village.

6. What would you recommend for improving Taxito ridesharing service?
In a long-run, I would say that to use the service, people must first know about it. Therefore, one has to do a bit better to raise awareness so that people know how it works… people must know that it is a safe thing. And when they have tried it, have experiences with it, then it will work better.

 

Interview with a passenger – a 45 year old woman, November 2020

 

1. Why did you use Taxito ridesharing service?
I think it [Taxito] is a cool thing to our village that has a very bad public transport… The reason why I first used Taxito because I was curious and wanted to know its techniques and how long do I have to wait until a driver picks me up … I had no technical problem to use it and waited for 15 minutes until a driver picked me up… Overall, I had a positive experience with Taxito.

I think ridesharing services are good for the environment because you drive your car anyway and if you can transport somebody on your way, then it is better. 

2. Please tell us more about your experience with Taxito ridesharing?
I found out that Taxito ridesharing is suitable for trips that you do not have to be in time, like for leisure purposes. But if I need to go for work or have to be at a place at a fixed time like a doctor’s visit then I would not use Taxito.

Taxito ridesharing is more flexible and spontaneous than a Postauto [bus]. When you want to go to somewhere at 2 pm, you do not have to wait for a Postauto [bus] that only departures at 3 pm [fixed timetable], because it is likely that somebody will drive through and pick you up.

It was a pleasant atmosphere…I have the feeling that this is a chance to become more open to new things.

3. Have you changed your mobility behaviour since you have used Taxito ridesharing?
I still use my car for travelling [laugh]. However, I willing to engage in Taxito ridesharing as a driver. About one year ago, I saw a light on a Taxito notice board, I turned my car back to pick up a person waiting there. But the person said s/he did not press the button… The one who did this perhaps was transported by some driver. It’s pity. I would have like to give somebody a ride… I would do this again when there is a chance.


With the beginning of New Year, we are starting with presentations of our PILOT PROJECT STORIES.

Our first story is located in GREATER LYON, FRANCE.

Pilot project »Health as an incentive for raising awareness and motivation for active mobility« is supporting 50 volunteers who committed themselves to change their commuting behaviours, in order to increase their life quality by using active modes (walking and cycling). Selected participants are supported with meetings, 2 medical visits, follow-up questionnaires.

Interview with VOLUNTEER: Laurent Vignat from Lyon, November 2020

1.Why did you decide to participate in the pilot project? (Motives, values, needs…)
I decided to take part in the scheme to give myself more motivation to use my bike (I would like to do more than 80% of my journeys by bike, 4 or 5 days a week)
I wanted to take part in a study encouraging people to cycle on a daily basis.
At my age (55), one or two visits to a sports doctor is not negligible.

2.Did you learn anything new participating in the pilot project? (new data, new people, new network, about yourself)
Travelling by bike to work more often reduces my stress levels (I can't stand traffic jams), meaning I’m more relaxed when I get to the lab.
When travelling by bike, my journey always takes the same amount of time (unless I get a puncture)

3. Did your mobility habits change to more sustainable mobility choices due to participation in the pilot project?
Yes, I have increased my number of bike journeys.


Interview with VOLUNTEER: Michel Fourot, from Lyon, November 2020

1. Why did you decide to participate in the pilot project? (Motives, values, needs…)
Because of my health problems, I have to do moderate exercise, such as walking, roughly 1 hour a day, if possible continuously. 
This can be difficult when you have to work.
Signing up to a commitment like 1,000 Kilometres gives me more motivation to exercise every day for at least half an hour.

2. Did you learn anything new participating in the pilot project? (new data, new people, new network, about yourself)
Yes, signing up to a challenge, in front of other people, knowing that we have everything we need: the scheme - 1,000 Kilometres the period - 6 months - the equipment - Smart watch - the commitment - Every day - you need to have the desire and the commitment.
It takes a level of willingness to make changes to your habits, whether good or bad.        

3. Did your mobility habits changed to more sustainable mobility choices due to participation in the pilot project?
No, I haven't really changed my transport habits. They are a bit different in that I walk more. I follow the bus route, but instead of waiting at the next stop, I go to the next one and then the one after that, as a way of getting my steps in.
I wouldn't say I’m obsessed by the tracker or my score...but maybe a little bit!


Interview with VOLUNTEER: Valérie, Lyon, November 2020

1. Why did you decide to participate in the pilot project? (Motives, values, needs…)
I had been looking to change my commuting habits for a while, and so for me the pilot scheme was an opportunity to do this, with additional motivation to make this change plus a way of tracking the impact this change will have. Those were my reasons for deciding to sign up.

2. Did you learn anything new participating in the pilot project? (new data, new people, new network, about yourself)
That’s a tough one. But I would probably say yes. It’s taught me (or reaffirmed) that changing your transport habits has a lot to do with motivation and how much effort you're willing to put in.

3. Did your mobility habits changed to more sustainable mobility choices due to participation in the pilot project?
Yes, if my journey and the circumstances on a given day are compatible with travelling by bike, then I travel to work or to meetings by bike. Otherwise, I use a combination of scooter or walking + public transport. 


Interview with VOLUNTEER: Laurence L. from Lyon, November 2020

1. Why did you decide to participate in the pilot project? (Motives, values, needs…)
I pay attention to my health, my sleep, how I manage my stress and my wellbeing, which I believe is closely linked to daily physical exercise.     
Taking part in a group initiative and having a way of tracking yourself are excellent motivators.
The fact that my employer supports this initiative shows that they recognise the positive impact physical activity can have on wellbeing at work.

2. Did you learn anything new participating in the pilot project? (new data, new people, new network, about yourself)
I thought I had been doing more than 10,000 steps a day, but it’s not as easy as that!
I've spent a lot of time working from home in 2020, which has significantly reduced my activity. When I’m at work in person, I reach 7,000 steps no problem, but it’s only 3,000 when I’m working from home.

3. Did your mobility habits changed to more sustainable mobility choices due to participation in the pilot project?
Yes, I cycle a lot, not just for commuting, but also for work trips.
I make sure I go out for walks on the days when I’m working from home.
 

Interview with VOLUNTEER: Laurence M, Lyon 2020

1. Why did you decide to participate in the pilot project? (Motives, values, needs…)
There were two main reasons for me deciding to participate in the scheme:

1 - To become less sedentary
I realised just how sedentary I had become, not only in terms of getting about (metro + bus) or at work (spending 10 hours at my computer every day), but also the rest of the time, as I had stopped doing any sport. The older you get, it has been accepted that a sedentary lifestyle is bad for your health. That’s why I took the opportunity to try out a change of mode of transport so I could walk at the start and at the end of my working day. Everything is overseen by the sport and health department at Croix Rousse hospital, both before and after the scheme.

2 - to play my part in helping to improve the environmental situation in Lyon (pollution, climate change, etc.)      
Although I used to travel by public transport as opposed to taking my own car, walking is a carbon-neutral activity.


2.  Did you learn anything new participating in the pilot project? (new data, new people, new network, about yourself)
I discovered that walking more than 4 km to work and the same coming back was doable in 50 minutes.
I realised how beautiful a city Lyon is and how nice it is to walk around in, especially in nice weather.
I also discovered that walking up to Croix-Rousse hospital in the evenings was too hard for me.


3.  Did your mobility habits changed to more sustainable mobility choices due to participation in the pilot project?
Yes, I think I will do more of my journeys on foot. But the health crisis had a big impact on the scheme.
Positives: People were advised not to take public transport in 2020, which promoted individual options.
Negatives: Lockdown and working from home made it difficult to establish a routine in terms of new ways of getting about.
With winter on the way, it’s possible that people will be less keen on getting about outdoors.


Interview with VOLUNTEER: Annie C. from Lyon, November 2020

Why did you decide to participate in the pilot project? (Motives, values, needs…)
I signed up to this scheme because I had been trying to motivate myself to combine public transport and walking for my commute to work. The 1,000 Kilometres scheme seemed to be in keeping with that, and so I thought, why not?

Did you learn anything new participating in the pilot project? (new data, new people, new network, about yourself)
It requires a degree of persistence, and it’s easy to get caught up in the game of wanting to walk and doing your steps. Personally, it’s tough for me to stay focused and to keep going, to persist even when it’s harder to motivate yourself, like now in November with the lockdown and winter on the way. I now manage to get in at least 6,000 steps every day, and sometimes a lot more! It’s really not a problem for me.

Did your mobility habits change to more sustainable mobility choices due to participation in the pilot project?
I would  really like to be able to combine public transport and walking for my commute to and from work. Unfortunately, even at rush hour, there are only 2 buses an hour, which isn’t enough, especially in the mornings. I live 7 km away from my work and the bus leaves an hour before I get there, so I only do it every now and then.

I do my walking every evening when I get back from work, at least half an hour or an hour. I go walking at the weekend and have stopped using my car for short journeys. I also go on short hikes. I want to be more active.


Interview with VOLUNTEER: Barka D-H from Lyon, November 2020

1.   Why did you decide to participate in the pilot project? (Motives, values, needs…)
I used to do quite a lot of sport before falling seriously ill. I underwent lengthy treatment for cancer and then I had to build myself back up again. That took 7 years, during which time I couldn’t properly do any sport without hurting myself. So when I heard about this scheme, it seemed to me like a good way of gently easing myself back into appropriate physical activity.

2.  Did you learn anything new participating in the pilot project? (new data, new people, new network, about yourself)
Not particularly, apart from the fact that this EU scheme exists and that it’s a good challenge. But the real benefit is that there’s more motivation when you're doing something together.

3.  Did your mobility habits changed to more sustainable mobility choices due to participation in the pilot project?
Yes, I pay more attention to how I get about, mostly for my health, but also for the environment.