FAQ

Frequently asked questions from applicants and project partners on project generation and application are answered on this page. They complete or explicit the information of the programme manual.
Please mind that the answers provided here refer to the period 2014-2020.

Frequently asked questions

You cannot find the answer to your question in either the handbook or the FAQ?
Contact us!
no display

The programme has rules on the minimum and maximum size of a partnership, which are at least 4 project partners from 4 countries and max. 15 project partners (including the lead partner and non-EU partners). Priority 4 projects are encouraged to limit the number of partners in the partnership to 10.

Overall, experience shows that a number between eight and twelve partners seems adequate for a successful implementation. The ideal size is determined by the objectives of the projects and the competences needed to implement it; a good balance should also be sought in terms of territory and type of partners (e.g. administrations, business support, NGOs, private sectors, etc.).

When defining the partnership, the following questions might be helpful: Which partners does the project need to be able to achieve the project objectives and results? Which partners are able to influence policies or procedures to enable that the envisaged changes in the chosen field? 

What is an ideal number of partners in a project?

The programme has rules on the minimum and maximum size of a partnership, which are at least 4 project partners from 4 countries and max. 15 project partners (including the lead partner and non-EU partners). Priority 4 projects are encouraged to limit the number of partners in the partnership to 10.

Overall, experience shows that a number between eight and twelve partners seems adequate for a successful implementation. The ideal size is determined by the objectives of the projects and the competences needed to implement it; a good balance should also be sought in terms of territory and type of partners (e.g. administrations, business support, NGOs, private sectors, etc.).

When defining the partnership, the following questions might be helpful: Which partners does the project need to be able to achieve the project objectives and results? Which partners are able to influence policies or procedures to enable that the envisaged changes in the chosen field? 

What is the role of observers and what is a good quality network of observers?

Observers may have different roles in a project. They enrich the partnership with expertise in the chosen field and/or promote the project results among target groups. They may test project outputs or implement them at the end of the project.  Ideally, they support the uptake of results at policy level. Therefore, not the number of observers, but their relevance within the chosen topic to achieve the envisaged results is important. 

Where can I get information on projects that have already been funded?

There are several possibilities to find co-financed Interreg projects, which were implemented already in former periods or which are still running that you can check on similarities or synergies:

On EU-wide level the Interact database keep.eu includes projects from the running funding period 2014-2020 as well as from previous funding periods (2000 – 2006, 2007 -2013).

If you would like to check especially Alpine Space projects from 2007 – 2013 the programme offers an overview on previous projects including their outputs and results which can be found on the following website: www.alpine-space.org/2007-2013

All websites of Alpine Space projects 2014 – 2020 can be accessed via an overview on the programme website. Here you can search by priorities, topics and location of partners.

What is the difference between an output and a deliverable?

Outputs are products delivered by the partnership as a result of the activities conducted during the project implementation. They must answer the needs of the target groups and, at the same time, demonstrate durability and transferability beyond the project partnership. Equally important is the fact that project outputs should be measurable and contribute to the programme output indicators. In the Alpine Space programme there are three types of project outputs: transnational cooperation structures, transnational strategic elements and transnational implementation elements.

Instead, a project deliverable is a side product that contributes to the development of an activity whose purpose is to support the completion of an output, either on its own or in combination with other activities.

NO DISPLAY

Persona (an archetypal user for whom the product or service is being designed)

Does the lead partner have the responsibility to collect and upload national requirements in the JEMS?

No, national requirements are not uploaded in the eMS. They are sent by the project partners to the relevant Alpine Space contact point. 

Does the programme co-finance infrastructure?

No, but under the budget line “equipment” small scale investments are possible, such as laser scans, sensors or drilling rigs.

Which rules do apply if a private project participant intends to contract an affiliated organisation?

Factsheet 1.4. on the eligibility of costs says that “expenses of organisations contracted via in-house-procurement (formerly known as affiliated institutions) can be considered as eligible as long as based on verified actual and eligible costs without any additional fees charged. The respective expenses shall be reported in the budget lines they would normally belong to if directly implemented by the project partner …i.e. staff costs calculation for an employee of such an organisation is the same as the one for an employee of the project partner”.

The logic behind this rule is that public procurement law is not applicable if contracting authority and contractor are tightly connected (so called “in-house procurement”, see factsheet 4.2). With the aim to ensure that ERDF-money is spent according to the principles of efficiency, economy and effectiveness also in these cases, the programme partners have defined the rule set out above.

Private partners are not subject to procurement law per se. However, as Alpine Space projects are co-financed with public funds, the partner states wanted to ensure that the principles of efficiency, economy and effectiveness are also applied when private partners purchase something in the course of a project. Therefore simplified rules for purchases of private partners have been defined in factsheet 4.2.

The principle of equality as it is laid down in community and national laws says that similar cases shall be treated in the same way. For the relevant question this means the following: Purchases of private partners shall not be regulated stricter than those of public partners. If EU-procurement directives regulate that procurement law is not applicable if contracting authority and contractor are tightly connected (for criteria to be fulfilled see directive 2014/24/EU, article 12 and respective national procurement law) then also private partners shall not be bound to any purchase rules in case they intent to contract an affiliated organisation.  This means that the rules as set out for purchases of private partners in factsheet 4.2. do not apply. However, since the private partner and the contractor are affiliated the above-mentioned rule of factsheet 1.4. still applies.

You couldn´t find what you were looking for?

Have a look at the project partner FAQ.